Cornwall Bike Week

What a Success

The sun shone, the rain stayed away and everyone descended on Cornwall at the Monkey Tree Holiday Park near Newquay. Members came from Devon, Dorset, Kent, Hampshire, Lancing, Norfolk, Glamorgan, Cardiff, Caerphilly, Reading, Bristol, Oxford, Derby, West Sussex, Northumberland, Shropshire and even France. I hope I haven’t missed any area out. A total of 58 bikes and riders originally entered. Unfortunately, four had to cancel before the start. We also had a high number of pillion passengers which was nice to see. Each day some of our older members from Cornwall Section started the runs off. There total age amounted to 350 years.

On Friday,  Roy Whittaker, assisted by Ted Clayton, waved the flag for 47 bikes to start the West Cornwall Run. We travelled the lanes of West Cornwall, taking in Penryn, one of Cornwall’s ancient towns, from where, in Medieval times, granite and tin were exported.  Gweek, on the Helford River was where we stopped for lunch. There is a famous seal sanctuary here and sick and injured seals are cared for and released back to sea. Having visited Portreath and St Agnes, Healey’s Cider Farm was our final stop of the day. Enough said!!!

Roy and Ted starting the first run of the week-end

Ted, on the left and Roy getting ready to  start the first run of the week-end

Here come the chief marshals ensuring everyone is behaving themselves

Here come the chief marshals, Bill & Janet, ensuring everyone is behaving themselves

 

Gaby from Dorset enjoying the roads of West Cornwall

Gaby from Dorset enjoying the roads of West Cornwall

 

Ted Clayton waved the flag, again, on Saturday for 47 bikes to the start of the North Coast and Moorland Run.  This day we visited St Endellion Farm Shop, skirted around Port Isaac, or is it Port Wenn, onto Colliford Lake Tavern, just off the A30 for lunch and finished with a tea break at the Screech Owl Sanctuary. One of the places we rode through was Slaughterbridge which is the site of King Arthur’s last battle. A large inscribed granite stone marks the place where King Arthur died. (see photo below). We also rode passed Jamaica Inn, made famous by Daphne du Mauruer’s story of smuggling.

 

Ted proudly waving the flag.

Ted proudly waving the flag at the start of Saturday’s North Coast and Moorland Run

 

P1020259

 

Tim Penn proudly showing off his 1928 Raleigh at the lunch stop on Saturday

Tim Penn proudly showing off his 1928 Raleigh at the lunch stop on Saturday

Oh, but what’s this. You’re supposed to ride your bike Tim……not take it for a walk!!

Tim Penn, President, walking his 1928 Raleigh over Trewornan Bridge on Saturday's Run

Tim Penn, President, walking his 1928 Raleigh over Trewornan Bridge on Saturday’s Run

 

 

Sunday saw the East Cornwall Run. On this route we travelled through the famous Clay Country, stopping at Wheal Martyn Clay Museum for coffee, skirting around the town of Fowey, passing the Lanhydrock Estate and riding through the Glynn Valley to the Halfway House for lunch. After lunch we visited the seaside town of Looe and the stannary town of Lostwithiel before heading back to camp. At Wheel Martyn Museum, one of the Cornwall members, Ken Westaway, put his speedway outfit on display. Some couldn’t resist trying it out, or at least standing on it.

 

Harold Westlake and Peter Sandry getting ready to start Sunday's East Cornwall Run.

Harold Westlake and Peter Sandry getting ready to start Sunday’s East Cornwall Run.

 

Rodney and Carol Hann leaving camp on their Laverda on Sunday

Rodney and Carol Hann leaving camp on their Laverda on Sunday

 

Len Dingley from Cornwall, trying out his speedway skills.

Len Dingley from Cornwall, trying out his speedway skills.

 

 

Enjoying a break at Wheal Martyn

Enjoying a break at Wheal Martyn

 

Not sure who this is....but he has a point!!

I think Dave Gunningham has a point here!

 

Roger Courtier is taking his responsibilities seriously at the Halfway House lunch stop!

Roger Courtier is taking his responsibilities seriously at the Halfway House lunch stop!

The majority of the photos about our week-end were taken by Merv Pearce who in the past could often be seen jumping out from hedgerows and around corners to catch you as you go past. Due to a serious illness he has not been so visible recently. However, we are delighted to see him up and about again and he was made ‘Chief Publicity Officer’ for this occasion.

Merv Pearce - Chief Publicity Officer

Merv Pearce – Chief Publicity Officer